11 Career Opportunities in Real Estate You Haven’t Thought of Yet

This article from realestateexpress.com discusses the career opportunities in real estate you haven’t discovered yet.

While being a residential real estate agent is one of the most common career opportunities associated with the real estate industry, it is by no means the only one. Yes, the majority of the high profile career opportunities in real estate involve buying and selling residential properties. However, the industry has depth, and there are many other jobs you can get with a real estate license. Whether you’re looking for something with more flexibility, more structure, higher stakes or lower stakes, you’re probably going to be able to find the career opportunity you want within real estate.

Career Opportunities in Real Estate

Wondering what you can do with a real estate license? We’ve put together a list of jobs you can get with a real estate license that you might not have considered. These opportunities are both challenging and have the potential to be profitable new careers for you!

1. Real estate managing broker

Being a real estate broker isn’t the same thing as being a real estate agent, even though the two terms are often informally used interchangeably. The difference between a broker and an agent is that a broker is a licensed real estate professional who has taken further education and is qualified to manage a real estate office with multiple agents. A real estate broker may be a career path to set your sights on if you’re already in the process of becoming an agent and want to know how your career could continue to grow. It’s one of the jobs that require a real estate license on this list, though not every job we have listed here does.

2. Commercial real estate agent

It’s natural to think of residential agents when you talk about the real estate industry. After all, that’s what most of the real estate reality T.V. shows are about and you also don’t see images on the cover of the tabloids about which celebrity leased office space lately. However, commercial development can be as rewarding as residential and in some cases may suit your style and strengths even better.

The day-to-day of a commercial real estate agent can include more research than that of a residential agent. A commercial agent helps businesses choose and secure locations that are going to boost their bottom line. While sometimes that means leasing great office space, other times it can be finding the perfect location for the next major coffee chain to build a store. For this reason, commercial agents often must put more emphasis on uncovering statistics and data about the area before they complete a transaction.

3. Real estate investor

There are two different ways to be a real estate investor — active and passive. You can think of an active investor as your classic “house flipper.” This person would buy and flip residential properties or would support the work of another investor or contractor who is buying a property for resale. A passive investor is someone who puts money into a real estate project without having much involvement in the day-to-day management of a project. Even if you don’t have much money to invest, you can still become an investor in crowdfunded real estate investing.

4. Residential appraiser

A residential appraiser is someone who collects information on a residential property in order to give a recommendation as to that property’s worth. Appraisers can work privately, such as to appraise your home before it’s sold or mortgaged, or for the government, such as to appraise your home to determine its value for tax purposes.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the median salary for real estate appraisers in 2016 was about $51,850 annually or about $25 hourly.

5. Commercial appraiser

Just like a residential appraiser, a commercial appraiser spends part of their day in the office and the other part of the day in the community assessing properties. While a residential appraiser may rely more heavily on what they learned during their licensing course, a commercial appraiser leans strongly on established appraisers to teach them how to determine the value of a property. Both disciplines require you to get licensed.

6. Property manager

When it comes to discovering what you can do with a real estate license, becoming a property manager is often a very appealing choice. A property manager is tasked with the responsibility of making sure a property — residential or commercial — runs smoothly and is, ultimately, making money for whoever owns it. When it comes to residential properties this could mean wearing many different hats such as leasing agent and repairman.

Depending on the size of the property and the strengths of the property manager some or all of these tasks could be outsourced and the property manager’s role is simply to coordinate them and make sure the property is upkept. This is more common for commercial property managers. If a job as a real estate manager interests you, this guide can help you learn everything you need to know about real estate management jobs.

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